The Top 12 Essential Aviation Acronyms, According to Pilots of Instagram

If anything is true in aviation, it’s that you’ll be continuously learning acronyms throughout your career. If you’re just starting in the industry, be forewarned, and don’t be overwhelmed. Natural curiosity will guide you; ask when you hear one you don’t know.

We polled our community of fans on Instagram to identify what they consider the essential acronyms in aviation, and many pilots responded. You’ll undoubtedly notice some important ones missing because there are so many, but consider this a place to start.

*Some acronyms have multiple popular interpretations for some letters, but the intent is the same. Depending on your instructors or where you did your research, you may notice some differences on this list.

Photo by Avel Chuklanov on Unsplash

PILOT SAFETY

Aviation is one of the most regulated industries in the world, so it’s no surprise you’ll learn acronyms that revolve around safety, starting with you. Before boarding any aircraft to fly, do a self-assessment and make sure you’re in the right headspace. If you are not 100% ready to fly, don’t. These acronyms are most commonly associated with pilots, but IMSAFE is helpful for any safety-sensitive position.

IMSAFE
I – Illness
M – Medication
S – Stress
A – Alcohol
F – Fatigue
E – Emotions/Eating

PAVE
P – Pilot
A – Aircraft
V – enVironment
E – External Pressures

BEFORE FLIGHT

Many aviation acronyms are checklists. These are just a few that you’ll repeat all the time.

ARROW – Make sure you have all required documents. Sometimes instructors teach AROW, without Radio Station License.
A – Airworthiness Certificate
R – Radio Station License
R – Registration Certificate
O – Operation Limitations
W – Weight and Balance

AVIATES – Always verify the airworthiness of an aircraft, and make sure all required maintenance is completed and up-to-date.
A – Annual Check
V – VORs
1 – 100 Hour Check
A – Altimeter/Pitot Static
T – Transponder
E – Emergency Location Transmitter
S – Static Inspection

NWKRAFT – Prepare for each flight by having all of the relevant information.
N – NOTAMs (A NOTAM is a notice with essential information about flight operations.)
W – Weather
K – Known Air Traffic Control (ATC) Delays
R – Runway Lengths
A – Alternate Airport
F – Fuel
T – Takeoff and Landing Distances

ATOMATOFLAMES – This checklist covers the equipment required for Visual Flight Rules (VFR) during the day.
A – Altimeter
T – Tachometer
O – Oil Pressure Gauge
M – Magnetic Compass
A – Airspeed Indicator
T – Temperature Gauge
O – Oil Temperature Gauge
E – Emergency Location Transmitter
F – Fuel Gauge
L – Landing Gear Extension Lights
A – Anti-Collision Lights
M – Manifold Pressure Gauge
E – ELT (Emergency Locator Transmitter)
S – Seatbelts

FLAPS – Verify your equipment required for Visual Flight Rules (VFR) during the night.
F – Fuses
L – Landing Light
A – Anti-Collision Lights
P – Position lights
S – Source of power

GRABCARD – You’ll remember the minimum equipment required under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) using this acronym.
G – Generator or Alternator
R – Radio/Navigation Appropriate For Flight
A – Attitude Indicator
B – Ball (Inclinometer)
C – Clock
A – Altimeter
R – Rate of Turn Indicator
D – Directional Gyro

Photo by Chris Leipelt on Unsplash

DURING FLIGHT

Communication is essential when on the ground and especially when in the air. Air Wisconsin makes it a point to teach pilots how to communicate with each other in the cockpit, disagree and have a productive conversation, and properly communicate with the Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower during training. Pilots must also be tuned in and engaged. You’ll hear these acronyms often.

ANC

A – Aviate

N – Navigate

C – Communicate

THE 5 Ts – The pilot who suggested this acronym admitted he never thought much of it as a student, but as a CFII, he can’t remind students enough.

T– Turn

T – Time

T – Twist

T – Throttle

T – Talk

The 3 Ps

P – Perceive

P – Process

P – Perform

DECIDE

D – Detect

E – Estimate

C – Choose

I – Identify

D – Do

E – Evaluate

BONUS

We wanted to include one more essential acronym—SAFETY. Always brief your passengers, if any are aboard. If you choose to become a commercial pilot, the Inflight announcement will cover most of the items listed below. However, if your pilot journey includes flying a helicopter, private charters, teaching, operating discovery flights, taking friends and family up for a ride, etc., it’ll be your responsibility.

SAFETY

S – Seat Belts

A – Air Ventilation

F – Fire Extinguisher

E – Emergency Procedure

T – Traffic

Y – “Your Questions”

What do you think is the most crucial acronym in aviation? If it’s not on our list, comment below to add it and help out future aviators reading this blog. As a bonus, we’ve compiled resources below worth checking out if you want to learn more acronyms or common industry abbreviations.

RESOURCES

FAA: Airport and Facility Codes

FAA: Acronyms and Abbreviations

AOPA – The ABCs of Aviation

Check us out on Instagram!

Highlighting the Women of Air Wisconsin: Part 2

If you missed Part 1 of our series, start HERE.

We continue to share insight from women throughout Air Wisconsin Airlines on our social media channels and in this blog series to acknowledge their contributions and to inspire. These women all have different stories, which gives them a unique perspective on what it takes to succeed, what’s truly important, and how to live your best life.

Like the women featured in this series, we also hope that educating girls and women on the types of jobs available will encourage them to explore the exciting world of aviation. The industry is male-dominated now, but it doesn’t have to stay that way. Whether you dream of the sky, love numbers, always tinker with mechanical objects or just have a general interest in aviation, there’s a path waiting for you.

A photo of Nidhi at her desk taken in 2020.

Every time you face a challenge, it could be a defining moment. Nidhi finds success in uncomfortable situations by pushing herself to learn and grow. In school, she was terrified of public speaking and realized no one could solve her problem for her. Nidhi committed to sharing something valuable in every presentation, meeting, or conversation and slowly got over her fear. 

Get out of your comfort zone. Go out there and start learning. No one ever shared this advice with Nidhi. She had to figure it out herself, but she credits this advice with getting her where she is today.

As a Financial Analyst, Nidhi performs multifaceted financial analysis related to operating costs, new business initiatives, labor negotiations with our various unions, etc. She also provides benchmark data to support decision-making, among other things. Nidhi knew she wanted to work in aviation, but one last challenge was in the way.

“I graduated last year in May with my Master’s degree in Aviation Finance. Due to the pandemic, being a new graduate was even tougher than usual… The only thing that did NOT change is the fact that I kept learning no matter what. I’d wake up every day, reach out to my mentors for guidance, keep looking for jobs, enroll in online classes that I found beneficial, and just kept going. Stopping was not an option I wanted to pursue, so I didn’t…

In the past, I have been told ‘Fake it ’till you make it’ or ‘Just suck it up’ when I was seeking advice from others. Now that I am living my life, those phrases hardly mean anything. Personally, I think you have to just be authentic and most importantly, kind to yourself. Just like everyone in this world, I have problems. Pretending like they do not exist does no good to me or anyone. So, my advice is to wake up, dress up, show up, have great coffee, and do such an incredible job that you feel self-motivated every single day without the need for external validation. Become the person you wish to seek advice from.”

— Nidhi Trambadia
Photo taken pre-pandemic.

Like pilots and aviation mechanics, Aircraft Dispatchers are predominately male but have more female representation. Fewer than 5,000 female dispatchers work in the U.S. Aviation industry. According to the FAA, they account for 19.4% of the group as of 2019. Jen joined the ranks after she decided to pursue a career as an Aircraft Dispatcher while working as a Ramp Agent.

Since joining Air Wisconsin, Jen’s career has evolved so much because she took the initiative and seized every opportunity that came her way. Say yes and get involved—that’s what we learn from Jen. Carpe diem!

“I am very proud of being a part of the Air Wisconsin Airlines Dispatch team. I started about 14 years ago as a Dispatcher after leaving the ramp in Minneapolis. I cross-trained as a Dispatch Coordinator and teach Recurrent Training. I also got Air Transportation Supervisor qualified, so I could conduct Competency Checks for Dispatchers. I am a member of the company’s Dispatch-Aviation Safety Action Program committee, working with the FAA to identify significant safety concerns and other unusual events. Finally, I ended up as a Dispatch Trainer. I am grateful for the opportunities I have been given as part of the Dispatch team. It’s challenging, and I get to work with an amazing group of people.”

— Jen Sloper
Photo taken pre-pandemic.

Since joining our company, Emily continues to let herself shine. Her contributions were noticed, and about a year after becoming a Flight Attendant, she was promoted to Inflight Domicile Manager. In this role, Emily oversaw the entire Inflight team based at her location. Not letting the expectations of others limit her goals, Emily earned another promotion to Hub Performance Manager.

In this role, Emily liaisons between Air Wisconsin and United’s hubs and outstations. Her keen eye is always focused on our operation and improving our performance. Emily reminds us to shoot for the stars.

“Don’t let norms dictate your goals; create goals to break the norms.”

— Emily Chaudhry
Photo taken pre-pandemic.

Some people have aviation in their blood. Bonnie was always going to work in the industry. First, she joined the Air Force for Air Traffic Control, and while waiting to hear back from the FAA on a position, she became a Flight Attendant. Later, a female First Officer suggested Bonnie take an observation flight to see if she wanted to be a pilot. Bonnie fell in love.

That female pilot became Bonnie’s mentor and still is to this day. That experience changed Bonnie’s life, and she believes in paying it forward by helping others who want to follow in her footsteps. Bonnie’s advice to future pilots is to always do the right thing and surround yourself with people who strive to be better every day. She proves that your path may not be easy or clear, but if you stay focused and invest in yourself, you’ll find a way.

“… She told me to take an observation flight, and I’d know in 5 minutes if it was the thing for me. I instantly fell in love with flying. After that, I bit the bullet, took out a loan, and took a chance on myself. I earned my ratings at ATP. I was given a chance to fly C208 caravans at 252 hours and still kept my job as a Flight Attendant to cover my bills. I would take the train to the Philadelphia airport after my 4 days of flying, sleep in the Minute Suites, and pick up my trip as a Flight Attendant and then commute home for 1 day off. I did that for 2 years to build my hours. Finally, I reached that magic number and went to chat with airlines at Sun and Fun, and that’s where I was introduced to Air Wisconsin. I haven’t looked back since.

The road may be tough and arduous at times, and some people will want to see you fail, but with true passion for the industry and drive in your heart, you will be unstoppable. I am so thankful I took a chance on myself and for having strong support from family, my mentor, and friends. I hope to see more women aviators in the sky.”

– Bonnie Rostad
Photo taken pre-pandemic.

Julia first joined our team as an Avionics Technician. In this role, Julie repaired various parts of the aircraft and performed maintenance like an A&P Mechanic, but additional certification allowed her to work on aircraft electrical systems. After completing our in-house training, she was promoted to her current role as an Inspector.

This vital position provides a check and balance inside of the hangar. Inspectors like Julia observe the mechanics, offer assistance, and double-check work before completing the sign-off. Julia also has the responsibility to inspect parts to determine if they can be refurbished or reused. Knowledge, excellent problem-solving skills, and critical thinking are instrumental in this career path.

Working with great people is one reason why Julia loves her job. Working for a smaller company has its perks and allows her to keep learning every day.

“I like the experience I get while working at Air Wisconsin. It’s a smaller company, so I have been able to learn about all parts of the airplane. Every day brings new challenges that need to be solved by troubleshooting.”

– Julia Darnick

Air Wisconsin is thankful to have such talented and inspiring people on our team. It’s a pleasure to play a developmental role in our employees’ careers and watch them grow.

If you only take one thing with you, let it be this: seize every opportunity to better yourself. And don’t be afraid to create those opportunities yourself. Every person experiences challenges in their life. How will you let those moments define you?


Explore all of our career opportunities HERE, and stay in touch by following us!

Highlighting the Women of Air Wisconsin: Part 1

This month, we’re highlighting women throughout our company on our social media channels and asking them to share advice or insight. The hope is that their words will inspire others, guide the next generation, and offer encouragement to anyone who needs it.

In this two-part series, you’ll hear from women whose careers are more commonly top-of-mind when you think of aviation and hear from women whose careers are not. We’ll highlight that women tend to be in the minority when it comes to many aviation careers such as pilot, mechanic, or aircraft dispatcher. Companies like Air Wisconsin and the organizations mentioned in this blog are trying to change that by educating girls and women on the types of opportunities available.

This series will also help amplify the voices of the women already in those roles at Air Wisconsin Airlines, providing an example and inspiration for anyone who chooses aviation as their career path. Please join us in celebrating and acknowledging the contributions made by these outstanding women.

Photo taken pre-pandemic.

As an A&P Mechanic, Kassidy performs maintenance and repairs various parts of the aircraft including working on the engine. This is a very technical job that requires problem-solving skills, the ability to troubleshoot complex problems, and the right certifications. Kassidy loves her job and plays a hands-on role in keeping our operation safe and on-time. She is one of the few female aircraft mechanics in the United States.

In December 2019, only 2.5% of aircraft mechanics in the US were women, according to the FAA. Out of all of the possible careers in aviation, this one has the smallest percentage of women. Many companies like Air Wisconsin are emphasizing the need for more diversity in the field and raising awareness.

Kassidy hopes more women pursue this rewarding career and reminds us all to find our support system. No one accomplishes anything alone.

“Always gaining knowledge and moving forward is what I love about my career. I have earned my place, but I was not walking alone. The individuals that stood by me and lent a helping hand when I needed it will always have my utmost appreciation and gratitude. Tomorrow is why I love working in this industry. Each day is brand new.”

– Kassidy Wykoff
Photo taken pre-pandemic.

Sonji discovered her passion for aviation by chance. When she graduated from high school, she wanted to become a Registered Nurse. After taking some business classes, Sonji started to lean toward Human Resources Management. But it wasn’t until she was hired as a Ramp Fleet Service Clerk with a mainline carrier that she realized how much she loved the fast-paced aviation industry.

Although she had jobs in other industries after, Sonji still loved aviation and eventually joined our team. Now, Sonji supports our largest crew base and positively impacts the lives of countless people every day. By supporting our crew members, they are better able to take care of our passengers.

Sonji reminds us that the people you work with every day make a world of difference. Find your work family.

“I am very proud of my strong work ethic and my ability to be a team player for the Inflight/Flight team. I am valued. Knowing that my work family appreciates what I do in the office daily motivates me… Follow your dreams, and never compromise your integrity.  Every step that you take in life is not easy, but always remain authentic. Figure out your purpose, and strive to reach it. Nothing happens overnight, so be patient with the process.  Don’t let your attitude determine your altitude. Be accountable for your actions. Don`t judge others, and encourage others who need direction in this journey called life.”  

— Sonji Nicholas
Photo taken pre-pandemic.

Interested in aviation? Take First Officer Trista’s advice and get involved with an aviation-based organization to explore the many different paths available. She suggests Women in Aviation International, which is the largest and most well-known. Other female-led aviation organizations include but are not limited to Sisters of the Skies and the Ninety-Nines.

If you want to fly as a career, you also have numerous options. During her career, Trista was a flight instructor, flew scenic tours, was part of a fire patrol team, flew corporate flights, and currently flies commercial flights for us under the United Express banner. In December 2019, 7.9% of pilots in the United States were women, according to the FAA. That number is slowly growing as more companies like Air Wisconsin and our partner United Airlines commit to encouraging girls and women to explore aviation and other opportunities in STEM.

Your journey is unique. Find the path that works for you and go for it! Trista is proof that childhood dreams come true if you’re willing to work hard and believe in yourself.

“I would highly recommend getting involved in one of the female aviation organizations like Women in Aviation International. These organizations provide several benefits and opportunities to members such as scholarships, networking, and mentoring… I love so many aspects of working in aviation… Being an airline pilot is all I’ve ever wanted to be since I was 8 years old. Every time an airplane would fly overhead, I would look up in amazement. Now whenever I step into the flight deck, I’m still just as amazed that this is my career. Being responsible for 50 passengers in a multi-million dollar aircraft is a huge privilege.”

— First Officer Trista Higgins
Cori pictured with her son.

Behind-the-scenes members of our Maintenance team like Cori make up about 30% of our Maintenance department at Air Wisconsin. As the Program Manager of Aircraft Components, Cori’s job impacts our entire operation. She manages all of the repairable components from our aircraft that are sent to third-party vendors for repair. Additionally, Cori ensures these vendors meet or exceed the standards set by our Maintenance Program. She also works closely with other internal departments to verify inventory levels are sufficient to support the operation.

Like many people, it took Cori some time to discover what she really wanted to do as a career. Inspired by her mother, she kept looking until she found one that fit. Cori teaches us not to settle—find something you’re passionate about.

“I would have never guessed that I’d end up in the aviation industry. I grew up watching my mom’s unwavering passion and dedication to her career and knew I wouldn’t be satisfied until I found an industry I was as passionate about. I changed my career path countless times during college until I found the right fit in aviation, and I haven’t looked back. I strive to emulate her passion and dedication and pass this along to my kids. Whether my kids are 5, 17, or 30, I want them to always look for that ‘perfect fit’ in whatever they do in life.”

– Cori Fuller

Lisa was born to soar in the sky. Like many people who become Flight Attendants, she was never interested in the 9-5 lifestyle. Traveling and meeting new people is exciting and a much better way to spend the day. You also have the chance to build strong, life-long friendships with fellow crew members.

Lisa also enjoys taking care of others, which is why being a Flight Attendant is so rewarding. Not only do you help transport people to important events and fun vacations, but you’re primarily responsible for their safety. Lisa reminds us that there’s a whole world to explore and plenty of opportunities for anyone who doesn’t want to sit at a desk all day.

“I love being a Flight Attendant as I love to travel and love customer service. You are always meeting different people from around the world. Come join the friendly skies with me, and I promise you never want to go back to any other job.”

– Lisa Hopkins

Click HERE to read part two. You’ll learn more about the different career paths available within aviation and meet more of the women who help make Air Wisconsin a leader in the regional airline industry.

Explore all of our career opportunities HERE.

Be sure to follow us on our social media channels!

Virtual Aviation-Themed Tours

We’ve all been searching for fun things to do during the pandemic, especially this winter. If you haven’t checked out virtual tours, it’s time. You can virtually visit The Louvre, The Great Wall, zoos, aquariums, rain forests, and countless places. Forbes put together their list of the 15 best virtual tours HERE. Of course, if your heart is set on aviation and aerospace, look no further.

There are many free aviation virtual tours out there and even some paid ones. Here are some of the free options options we enjoyed.

Photo by Meriç Dağlı on Unsplash taken at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

You can take a virtual tour of the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. Hover your mouse over the screen, and white arrows will appear on the ground telling you where you can go. You’ll see many different types of aircraft and spacecraft in the hangar.

You can also tour the National Mall Building, but unfortunately, this experience doesn’t include detailed information on the exhibits, and the displays are difficult to read.

It’s also worth noting that the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum frequently hosts events on Facebook and goes live to show off artifacts or discuss various topics.

Naval Aviation Museum

You can “walk the museum” and information icons (i) pull up detailed information on the exhibit and featured items. White arrows show you where you can go as you move throughout the museum.

Photo by Nicholas Vassios on Unsplash at the EAA Museum.

EAA

As you would expect, EAA has many, many virtual tours featuring historic aircraft including a replica of the Wright Brothers 1911 Flyer Model B. You can enjoy the scenic trip through the Eagle Hangar or jump to popular aircraft. Scroll down the landing page to see your options.

National Museum of the United States Air Force

Take a self-guided 360-degree tour of the museum. Blue arrows let you know which directions you can go. You’ll also see suggested areas of the museum across the bottom of the screen, allowing you to jump to a certain section. You can also zoom in and get a better look at displays or read the text. We wish all virtual museum experiences had this capability!

Museum of Flight

Take 360-degree tours of well-known aircraft from the comfort of your home, hotel, or wherever you might be. You can also “walk” inside a NASA Full Fuselage Trainer.

Photo by Simon Fitall on Unsplash.

Cockpit 360 App

Want to check out cockpits? This app is free and worth trying. It’s available on iOS and Android.

Have a favorite virtual aviation-themed tour that isn’t on our list? Add it in the comments. We’d love to hear about it. Happy exploring!

Ways You Can Give Back Right Now

2020 continues to be a surprising and difficult year, and 2021 won’t be without challenges. With so much out of our control, it feels good to be able to take action and make a positive impact. There are many ways you can give back to others and your community this holiday season and throughout the pandemic. Here are some ideas to get you started.  

Air Wisconsin Airlines is not associated with any of the organizations listed below, and we recommend that you research any organization yourself before getting involved.

Check in with the people you care about.

Traditionally, the holidays mean large indoor gatherings, something the CDC suggests we avoid for the foreseeable future. Following CDC guidance is important to protect yourself and your loved ones, but unfortunately, it can be lonely. Maintaining vital connections creates a support system, which is especially beneficial when things get rocky, like during a pandemic. Talk and share a laugh with family and friends, just do it virtually or while social distancing. If you don’t have FaceTime, anyone can sign up for Zoom and use it for free; just know that the free version limits meetings to 40 minutes.

Graphic from CDC

Donate items to nonprofit organizations. 

If you discover that you have clothes your kids grew out of last year or household items you don’t use anymore, consider donating them. Remember that the needs of nonprofits may continue to change during the pandemic. Be sure to check their website to see what items they are accepting and what they really need right now.

Volunteer while following CDC preventive guidance.  

Many nonprofits need volunteers year-round, like local food banks or Meals on Wheels. Contact nonprofits in your area and ask how you can help. Also, during the pandemic, it’s best to avoid unexpectedly showing up to volunteer as new guidelines or capacity limits may be in place.

Another idea is to volunteer virtually. For example, you could help blind and low vision people complete tasks through BeMyEyes.com. This service is free to blind and low vision people and relies on volunteers. All you need is a mobile device to sign up.

Photo by Alex Mecl on Unsplash

Help community members in need.

Want to help someone, but not sure who needs it? Check Facebook’s COVID-19 Information Center to see who needs help in your area or outright offer help. Picking up groceries for a housebound neighbor and leaving them at the front door is an easy way to make a difference. 

You can also check out the Nextdoor app to stay connected to what is going on in your area.

Thank health care workers, first responders, and other essential workers.  

No one has seen how ugly and devastating this virus can be more than health care workers and first responders. These and other groups of essential workers keep our communities functioning despite the pandemic. Express your gratitude by:

  • Recording a voice message of encouragement on the Health Hero Hotline by calling 877-226-4376.
  • Recording a video with an uplifting message for someone who deserves it on your cell phone and uploading it to www.6ftcloser.com, a site encouraging recognition of everyday heroes.
  • Visiting your local hospital’s Facebook page and website. See if they are requesting certain items to help support frontline workers or if they have a program in place for the public to send messages.
  • Reaching out to essential workers you know and offering to drop off a meal, pick up groceries, or ask how to help them.
  • Making a yard sign or sign for your window. Turn this into a fun activity for the kids.
  • Being kind. Tensions can run high during times of stress. Remember, we’re all doing the best we can. Common courtesy goes a long way.

The biggest way you can help essential workers and the general public is by properly wearing a mask, social distancing, and following CDC COVID-19 preventive guidance. In doing so, you can alleviate the burden on hospitals by not unknowingly spreading the virus and not getting sick yourself. If fewer people became ill with the COVID-19 virus, health care professionals could better care for patients.

Photo by Nicholas Bartos on Unsplash

Helping COVID-19 patients.

As pointed out by the CDC, most people who become ill with COVID-19 can recover at home. Picking up medications or groceries and leaving them at the door are easy ways to help someone recovering at home. You could offer to watch a pet, allowing the person to focus more on themselves. Or, depending on where you live, winter weather means there are walkways to be shoveled.

You’ll also find many worthy charities on the web who help cover hospital costs for COVID-19 patients or help them in another way, but there are some scams too. Before donating money to any organization, read the FTC’s guide on how to verify a charity is legitimate at www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0074-giving-charity#.

Think about how you can use your passion for good. 

Do you love reading? Start a virtual book club. Are you a yoga fan? Host a weekly yoga session on Zoom for friends who want to participate. Miss talking with your neighbors or colleagues? Start a weekly social hour and connect on Zoom or FaceTime.

How will you give back? 

Every holiday season Air Wisconsin participates in the Salvation Army’s Adopt-A-Family program in Appleton, Wisconsin, where our headquarters is based. Throughout the year, we match employee charitable donations, allowing us to positively impact many of the different communities we serve across the country and support the causes that matter most to our employees. We host blood drives and encourage employees to get involved in their communities. During a normal year, our company also participates in charity runs and events as a team.

All photos of employees were taken pre-pandemic.

Giving back can be done on a larger scale, but it can also be done within your social circle or your community. It’s all about connecting and making a difference. Right now, we could all use more positivity and support. If you choose to give of yourself, you’ll create moments of joy for yourself and others.

Fall Coloring Pages

Break out the crayons or markers and bring all of the warm, inviting colors of fall to life on our new coloring pages. Print each design separately, or print the page featuring all four of our fall-themed designs.

Aviator Bear

Fall Travel

My Gourdness, It’s Fall

Soaring Over the Trees

Know someone who would enjoy these? Share the fun!

Break out the crayons or markers! Check out the new fall-themed coloring pages from @airwisconsin. #avgeek #aviation

Introducing Our New Role: Quality Control Managers

Reinforcing our focus on safety, Air Wisconsin Airlines created a new position at all of our maintenance bases—the Quality Control Manager—reporting to the Chief Inspector. This role focuses on the proper implementation of the processes outlined in the General Maintenance Manual as well as DOT, FAA, and other Company policies and procedures. Establishing this position in each base provides more support to Aircraft Inspectors and the Tech Ops team as a whole.

Having another person on the floor with extensive experience allows for more mentorship opportunities. Quality Control Managers use their years of experience inspecting aircraft in FAR Part 121 Air Carrier environments to coach Aircraft Inspectors. By passing on their knowledge, Quality Control Managers help sharpen their co-workers’ skills, making sure that expertise stays within the Air Wisconsin family.

One of our CRJ-200s at our Milwaukee Tech Ops base.

Additionally, these managers contribute to their base in many other ways. Quality Control Managers help oversee work on the hangar floor, assist in building efficient schedules, and ensure the aircraft maintenance records at their base are processed timely and accurately. Additionally, they act as the department liaison with the DOT and FAA in local matters relating to airworthiness and regulatory compliance. Quality Control Managers also assist with internal and FAA audits, among other things.

We’re excited to add this new, impactful role to our Tech Ops team and look forward to finding the best candidates for the job. Learn more about qualifications HERE.

Explore all of our career opportunities at www.airwis.com/careers.

Adults Love Coloring Too

Last month we created aviation inspired coloring pages with you in mind. We’re happy to help keep your little future pilot or mechanic busy for a while, so you can finish that conference call. They were a hit!

Now, we invite you relax and indulge in some coloring of your own.

Have an idea for another coloring page? We’d love to hear it! Let us know in the comments below.

Enjoy Our Coloring Pages

Spending more time at home can be challenging during the pandemic, especially if you have younger children. We wanted to help! If you’re looking for something fun to do with the kids (or for yourself), check out our coloring pages.

We have four different designs below and a one page .pdf that combines all of the art to conserve paper. These were designed to fill an entire 8.5” x 11” page. You can select “fit to page” or “fill page” when printing for optimum results.

Be sure to share the masterpieces on social media and tag us @AirWisconsin or #AirWisconsin.

Happy Coloring!




Technology Makes the Airline World Go Round

Technology Makes the Airline World Go Round: Celebrating the People Behind-the-Scenes

Imagine an airline employee. You are probably picturing a Captain sporting some aviators or a friendly Flight Attendant. Typically, you don’t think of all the people behind-the-scenes in various departments who contribute to a smooth operation like Information Technology. This team plays an important role at Air Wisconsin. There’s no question that technology has immeasurably changed our daily lives and enhances the way we work by solving problems and making tasks more efficient.

Some tasks seem simple, but have a far reaching impact. Air Wisconsin’s Network team blocks about 33,000 spams emails from reaching employees every single day. In 2019, our Help Desk created over 2,300 tickets to help solve over 2,300 problems.

Whether it be for Finance, Human Resources, Benefits, or another department, I.T. supports applications and programs employees use daily—that’s over 100 different products company-wide. Plus, you’ve got all the hardware like computers, fax machines, phones, etc. Technology also specifically impacts our crewmembers in numerous ways.

If you ever think about flying for Air Wisconsin, H.A.W.K. will likely be the first piece of software you see. H.A.W.K. or Hiring Aviators With Knowledge is a custom application created by members of our software development team to help make the pilot recruiting process better. This iPad friendly app makes it easy to gather information about interested candidates at events and follow their progress through the entire recruiting process. Our recruiters don’t miss the days of having to keep track of hundreds of tiny paper forms.

H.A.W.K. lets us easily gather information from interested candidates at events.

Every Air Wisconsin pilot is given an iPad during training that they continue to use on the line instead of carrying around bulky paper charts. I.T. offers around the clock support 365 days a year to ensure the Flight team has the tools they need to keep our operation running smoothly and safely.

Flight Operations and I.T. created and support custom ACARS (Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System) functions. Pilots use ACARS to send short messages between the aircraft and SOC or ground stations. The addition of these custom functions let Air Wisconsin automatically capture and report data to help make smarter, more efficient choices. Plus, I.T. oversees a suite of products to manage crew planning and flight tracking as well as the integration process with United’s I.T. systems.

Crewmembers can access their schedules and hotel information from an app.

Our crewmembers also regularly use an application called Crew Self Service or CSS. Flight Attendants and pilots can easily check their schedule, get flight details and hotel information using our mobile friendly app. Plus, CSS allows messages to be sent to all crewmembers at once.

Beyond that, some members of our Information Technology team are focused on process improvements, strategic planning, or helping other departments find the technology solutions that best meet their needs. I.T. professionals may not immediately come to mind when you think of airline employees, but they contribute to our airline’s success every day.

Explore all of our career opportunities or learn more about us at www.airwis.com.